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Learn how to eat foods that help improve your glycemic index

Jan 13, 2021 6:26:49 PM / por Diabetrics Healthcare

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Diabetes is a chronic health condition in which blood sugar (glucose) levels tend to rise due to insulin deficiency, insufficiency, or difficulty to work properly. Learn here a list of convenient and non-convenient foods to prevent or treat this disease.

Although it is common to hear that food plays an important role in the integral well-being of people, it is possible that not everyone understands the reasons why it is necessary to pay attention to each type of food we put in our mouths. This is so relevant, that in the treatment of conditions such as diabetes - whether type 1, type 2 or gestational - diet plays a major role.

In a person with diabetes, the impact the selection of proteins, fats and carbohydrates has is enormous. Even though the foods that contain these nutrients are part of a balanced diet, there are some that are much more nutritious or healthy than others. Learn here about the foods you should eat and see the recommended daily servings in the food pyramid for people with diabetes.

 

Avoid type 2 diabetes, eat healthy

According to a study published by the European Journal of Epidemiology (EJE), “the global prevalence of type 2 diabetes (DM2) is increasing rapidly”, in parallel with factors such as the increase in obesity, the sedentary lifestyle and dietary changes associated with unhealthy eating habits.

The research — which indicates that 415 million people had DM2 in 2015 and the projection towards 2040 is that this number increases to 642— indicates that to prevent the appearance of DM2 both at an early and advanced age, the optimal selection of food plays a fundamental role.

The impact that the selection of proteins, fats, and carbohydrates in a person with diabetes is enormous. Even though the foods containing these nutrients are part of a balanced eating plan, there are some that are much more nutritious or healthy than others. Learn here about the foods you should eat and see the recommended daily servings in the food pyramid for people with diabetes.

 

To consider when eating

To reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes and the onset of coronary heart disease, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends eating foods that provide the body with essential nutrients, and advises:

  • Fill half the plate with non-starchy vegetables such as carrots, broccoli, green beans, kale, cauliflower, among others.
  • Choose lean meats (such as skinless chicken and turkey, lean cuts of pork or meat such as sirloin or roast), and low-fat dairy products (such as low-fat milk or low-fat yogurt).
  • Choose whole grains like brown rice, barley, and quinoa, instead of refined or processed grains.
  • Avoid consuming sugary drinks.
  • Remember that special foods for people with diabetes, in addition to being more expensive, may not be as healthy as sensible portions of their favorite foods.
  • Choose healthy fats and consume them in small amounts. Use oils such as olive, canola or sunflower.
  • To accompany salads, walnuts, seeds, and avocado are healthy ingredient options.

 

Food pyramid for people with diabetes

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References

- Lukas Schwingshackl, Georg Hoffmann, Anna-Maria Lampousi, Sven Knüppel, Khalid Iqbal, Carolina Schwedhelm. Food groups and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies [Internet]. 2017 [published online April 10, 2017; accessed May 23, 2019]. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5506108/

- American Diabetes Association [website]. [Updated March 23, 2017; accessed May 23, 2019] Healthy eating. Available at http://www.diabetes.org/es/usted-corre-el-riesgo/reduzca-su-riesgo/alimentacin-sana.html

- Lorena Drago, Amparo González, Mark Molitch. Diabetes and Nutrition: Carbohydrates. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism [Internet journal] 2008 [accessed May 23, 2019]; volume 93, number 3, page E2. Available at: https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article/93/3/E2/2623146

Tags: Nutrition and Lifestyle

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